pinknavel

Let The Club Meeting Commence: EPIC by Pink Navel

The emergence of the Twitch livestream as a vessel for creativity and ingenuity has given creatives unparalleled access to instant feedback and reaction from others—fans, trolls, and fellow creatives alike. Dev, aka Pink Navel, has championed this platform, using their Epic Club streams (as lovingly referred to by them and their audience) to game, take calls, make beats, and freestyle while receiving real time feedback and love from dedicated fans and mutuals. Continue reading Let The Club Meeting Commence: EPIC by Pink Navel

donda

Kanye West Plays Super-Coordinator On Donda, His Entertaining Christian Rap Jukebox

Donda is Kanye’s 10th solo studio album, arriving on Sunday (of course), August 29th, and running at a whopping 1 hour and 48 minutes, or the length of an average movie. The album confirms that God wasn’t merely a subject to temporarily explore through his music, but instead the nucleus that will define a whole era, and potentially the entire future, of Kanye West’s music. Named after his late mother, Donda will be remembered as much for its promotional packed-arena listening parties as it will for the music itself. Continue reading Kanye West Plays Super-Coordinator On Donda, His Entertaining Christian Rap Jukebox

It’s Been A Whole [LIMBO] Year: Aminé’s Limbo Turns One

One year after the release of his sophomore album Limbo, the Portland rapper’s adamant self-determinations—as well as his aptitude for blending flippant arrogance with visceral vulnerability—still captivate and shine as some of his best work to date. Limbo represents a crossroads in Aminé’s life: a state of uncertainty and experimentation he experiences while attempting to find his place in life and in music. Continue reading It’s Been A Whole [LIMBO] Year: Aminé’s Limbo Turns One

isaiah rashad

5 Thoughts on Isaiah Rashad’s New Album ‘The House Is Burning’

You could argue the peaks on THIB may not be as high as those on his other albums (Wat’s Wrong, Shot You Down), but as a holistic project, it’s Rashad’s best achievement yet. In what could be considered a risky move, he pivoted away from rapping and fully committed to utilizing his voice as a mood-setting melody-manipulating instrument. Thanks in part to a portfolio of smartly-curated production and a complementary guest list, the music on THIB is extremely cohesive without ever being dull. And yet, THIB’s greatest strength is its ability to replace Rashad’s vivid personal narratives with a more casual chilled-out aesthetic, while not sacrificing any of the intimacy. Continue reading 5 Thoughts on Isaiah Rashad’s New Album ‘The House Is Burning’

questlove

5 Takeaways from Questlove’s Summer of Soul Documentary

What 300,000 concert-goers got to experience in person 50 years ago, the world now gets to watch up close and personal. As the musical time capsule that is Summer of Soul shares its treasures, it evokes a strong sense of nostalgia for a foregone era, while not ignoring the significant cultural and political challenges of the period. Here are our 5 takeaways from the incredible documentary. Continue reading 5 Takeaways from Questlove’s Summer of Soul Documentary

Twin Shadow

Appreciating Twin Shadow’s Dominican-infused Rock: A Journey From His ‘Broken Horses’ EP to His New Self-titled Album

The differences between the Santo Domingo and Port Antonio Edits may be so subtle that you barely even notice, but there’s a reason Twin Shadow released the Broken Horses EP with both versions: he wants his music to have global citizenship. The Broken Horses EP symbolizes how the nuances between different cultures’ music should not be  ignored; on the contrary, they should be celebrated. Sometimes it’s most important to recognize the uniqueness between musical traditions that share the most in common, such as the island countries of the Dominican Republic and Jamaica.  Continue reading Appreciating Twin Shadow’s Dominican-infused Rock: A Journey From His ‘Broken Horses’ EP to His New Self-titled Album

Summer of Soul

REVIEW: Questlove’s Summer of Soul (…Or When The Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

Director Questlove’s Summer of Soul takes us into the heart of Harlem, New York, where the most prominent and iconic Black musicians performed over the course of a six-part concert series during the summer of 1969. The footage of those performances is so spectacular, and the film’s commentary so engaging, that viewers will never think about the summer of Woodstock without also remembering the mini revolution that took place downtown at Mount Morris Park in the city. A revolution not televised… until now.  Continue reading REVIEW: Questlove’s Summer of Soul (…Or When The Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

Kwajo Stay Up!

Dusk-lit Drives Across Deserted Highways: Stay Up! By Kwajo

There is a certain feeling that is inextricably linked to the idea of summer drives at dusk—a feeling of total presence in the moment and untamed, unabashed hope for what’s to come. Stay Up!, the latest single by DMV rapper Kwajo, gracefully captures that sentiment. Continue reading Dusk-lit Drives Across Deserted Highways: Stay Up! By Kwajo

GoldLink Doesn’t Try To Be Bigger Than His Music

With the heavily distorted and almost muffled vocals on HARAM! GoldLink’s raps don’t dominate his album’s sound like rappers’ raps usually do. Like on his previous albums, Diaspora in particular, GoldLink doesn’t feel the need to make it all about him. He wants to be a part of the music, he doesn’t want to be the music. Continue reading GoldLink Doesn’t Try To Be Bigger Than His Music

J. Cole Embraces the New Era of Hip Hop and Goes Back to Rapping for Sport On The Off-Season

Despite the open-minded new direction Cole takes, make no mistake: he shows zero mercy on The Off-Season. He hasn’t sounded this hungry since his mixtape days, when the young simba was rapping for sport, lyrically terrorizing other rappers and threatening anybody in his path, punchline by punchline. On his new album, he returns to his rap-first think-later instincts that defined his early mixtapes. Continue reading J. Cole Embraces the New Era of Hip Hop and Goes Back to Rapping for Sport On The Off-Season

Shrooms, Tunes, and a Haunted Guitar: The Making of Shakey Graves

Shakey Graves has mystified and entertained crowds with his Americana musical blend for over a decade. With the release of Roll the Bones X, the origin of his beautiful, haunting melodies has been unearthed for all to hear. Read the full article for the story behind the artist, his new album, and the haunted guitar at the center of it all. Continue reading Shrooms, Tunes, and a Haunted Guitar: The Making of Shakey Graves

Introducing Jay Jordan: The Young Producer Making Lo-fi Beats And Channeling Hip Hop Nostalgia

Hip hop producer Jay Jordan is taking it back to the basics, crafting nostalgia-infused beats that glitch and glide with soulful purpose. The amount of heritage, history, and legacy that is all consciously packed into Jordan’s work makes for a profound statement from an artist who’s just getting started. Continue reading Introducing Jay Jordan: The Young Producer Making Lo-fi Beats And Channeling Hip Hop Nostalgia

Sturgill Simpson and The Steep Canyon Rangers Land a Lethal One-Two Bluegrass Punch

Two bluegrass albums came out last Friday from Sturgill Simpson and the Steep Canyon Rangers: two well-known acts in the country and folk music spheres. In terms of popular appeal, it might end up being one of the biggest days … Continue reading Sturgill Simpson and The Steep Canyon Rangers Land a Lethal One-Two Bluegrass Punch

Kendrick Lamar’s ‘The Prayer’ is a Critique of How Society Values Art

Of the three songs leaked on September 5th, The Prayer is the closest to album-grade Kendrick in terms of sound mastering and depth of concept. In exploring the concept of dualism between art vs. artist on the track, Lamar questions why the legacy of an artistic creation must depend on the reputation of the artist’s personal character. Continue reading Kendrick Lamar’s ‘The Prayer’ is a Critique of How Society Values Art

Introducing JoeJas: The Free-spirited Hip Hop Artist Doing Everything Himself

On JoeJas’s Spotify bio, he explains how his music is inspired by his personal experiences being labeled weird and different. After listening to his music and checking out his various design projects, it becomes clear that being weird and different is an asset, not a hindrance, for the UK-based creative. Few artists embody today’s limitless do-it-yourself (DIY) spirit quite like utility man JoeJas, who has found a way to control the entire narrative, all from his own island.  Continue reading Introducing JoeJas: The Free-spirited Hip Hop Artist Doing Everything Himself

The Top 5 Songs from High Fidelity

Zoë Kravitz stars in Hulu’s spinoff of the 2000 RomCom movie High Fidelity; both are based on Nick Hornby’s novel of the same name. In Hulu’s version, Rob (Kravitz) is the music-obsessed owner of a record shop in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. The show’s soundtrack is an incredible curation of music from all eras and genres, thanks in large part to Executive Music Producer Ahmir Thompson, AKA The Roots’ Questlove, and the people at Aperture Music. Here’s our list of top 5 songs from the show, and why. Continue reading The Top 5 Songs from High Fidelity

Presenting… Erykah Badu’s Quarantine Concert Series

With the future of in-person concerts paused for the foreseeable future, musicians and fans alike are hoping that virtual concerts and performances can temporarily fill the void. One of the musicians looking to make the most of the circumstances is neo-soul legend Erykah Badu. Joined by her live band, Badu has streamed 3 performances from Dallas in increasingly elaborate settings, featuring jam sessions, experimental dj remixes, and commentary on everything from the COVID-19 pandemic to asteroids flying towards earth. Continue reading Presenting… Erykah Badu’s Quarantine Concert Series

Introductions to the Dinner Party Roster

Terrace Martin, 9th Wonder, Robert Glasper, and Kamasi Washington have come together to form a new supergroup. They blessed the world with their 7-song debut album, called Dinner Party, this past Friday. In collective form, the group is musical royalty: an elite roster made up of musicians who continue to thrive at the creative forefronts of their respective genres. Continue reading Introductions to the Dinner Party Roster

The Gradually Increasing Significance of Kids See Ghosts

Creating one of the most innovative albums in a respective genre, as Cudi did with MOTM, comes with the burden of astronomical expectations and an elevated standard, which make it extremely challenging to follow up. With KSG, Cudi finds that elusive spark that made his albums from a decade earlier so visceral, evocative, and… alive. The key difference on KSG is that he’s shed his tendencies toward self-consciousness and insecurity, and replaced them with self-motivation and faith – culminating in his symbolic re-birth. Continue reading The Gradually Increasing Significance of Kids See Ghosts

REVIEW: Thundercat continues to invent his own brand of groovy and goofy soul

Thundercat is on a mission to build his own brand of funky neo soul music. On his new album, It Is What It Is, the talented bassist concocts another blend of avante garde jazz with funky bass lines and dopey humor. Thundercat throws the weirdness of an Adult Swim segment into the webs of contemporary jazz compositions to tell goofy love stories that bring his musical comics to life. Continue reading REVIEW: Thundercat continues to invent his own brand of groovy and goofy soul

REVIEW: Childish Gambino’s 3.15.20 is a sprawling example of anti-genre

   Childish Gambino does a little bit of everything on his best album yet: 3.15.20. By drawing clear influence from the likes of Frank Ocean, Prince, Kanye West, Toro y Moi, and Andre 3000, Gambino creates an eclectic and sprawling work that’s been a decade in the making. On 3.15.20, Donald Glover shifts the paradigm of what anti-genre entails in contemporary music – but his newest experiment doesn’t come without a catch. Continue reading REVIEW: Childish Gambino’s 3.15.20 is a sprawling example of anti-genre